men, masculinities and gender politics

Authors

Working with Boys and Men

The role of men and boys in achieving gender equality – UN DAW, 2008

This United Nations report, published by the Division for the Advancement of Women in December 2008, focuses on the role of men and boys in achieving gender equality.

Please see below for the attachment, in PDF.

The Truth About... Men, Boys and Sex: Gender transformative policies and programming

The age of AIDS carries in its wake a renewed and belated recognition of the particular vulnerability of young women and girls through harmful gender norms and inequality. Yet all too often sexual and reproductive health and HIV programmes fail to engage men and boys to become better lovers, partners and fathers – for their own benefit, that of their partners and families and for changing gender stereotypes.

The AIM Framework - Addressing and Involving Men and Boys To Promote Gender Equality and End Gender Discrimination and Violence

Michael Kaufman’s framework provides an accessible and compelling account of the need to involve men and boys in building gender equality. Written in 2003, it offers a strategic approach with which to mobilize men and boys to work on their own and in partnership with women and girls to transform destructive masculinities, end oppressive gender relations, and promote gender equity and equality.

Please see below for the attachment, in both PDF and RTF.

Engaging Men and Boys to Achieve Gender Equality: How can we build on what we have learned? (2007)

• What is the evidence on the effectiveness of programmes engaging men and boys in sexual and reproductive health; HIV prevention, treatment, care and support; fatherhood; gender-based violence; maternal, newborn and child health; and gender socialization?

• How effective are these programmes?

Engaging Boys and Men in Gender Transformation: The Group Education Manual

Engaging Boys and Men in Gender Transformation: The Group Education Manual (2008) is produced by EngenderHealth and Promundo. This is an educational manual for working with men to question non-equitable views about masculinity and develop more positive attitudes to prevent unhealthy behaviors that put them and their partners and families at risk. It can also be used to train facilitators who will implement workshop activities with groups of men. The activities are intended for use with men of all ages, although some adaptations might have to be made depending on the ages of the men and the country and community context. These activities can also be adapted for use with groups of men and women.

Men’s Collective Struggles for Gender Justice: The Case of Anti-Violence Activism

Men’s anti-violence activism is an important case study of male involvement in struggles for gender justice. What does this activism involve, why do men participate, and how do patriarchal inequalities shape both men’s efforts and their reception?

Boy friends

Making boys anti-sexist will soon be on the curriculum of many school systems. "We can do even better," claims Nick Sellars.

Dangerous opportunities

Jeremy Ludowyke examines the gender equity debate in education.

What about the boys?

Stephen Fisher assesses three approaches to boyswork. Please see below for the attachment, in PDF.

Effective Multi-Cultural Organizing Strategies For Men To End Men’s Violence

Sexual violence is a men’s issue. Men perpetrate the vast majority of sexual assault –
regardless of the gender of the person victimized; men too are victimized, and men are
the significant others (lovers, housemates, sons, classmates, brothers, cousins…) of
women and men who are sexually victimized. In all of these ways, sexual violence is an
issue that men confront. In spite of this, and in spite of the increasing efforts over the
past 20 years to define sexual violence as a men’s issue, men, by and large, continue to
ignore, deny, minimize, and otherwise avoid the issues of sexual violence. Sexual
violence is still conceived of as a “woman’s issue,” and men still make up only a tiny
minority of those present at events addressing sexual assault.