men, masculinities and gender politics

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CFP: Special issue on Men, Masculinities, and Violence, Graduate Journal of Social Science

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CALL FOR PAPERS & ARTWORK
Special issue on Men, Masculinities, and Violence
Graduate Journal of Social Science

Social scientists have been interested in examining men’s gendered behaviors and relationship to violence for many decades. Feminist analyses and interventions regarding violence against women have brought much needed attention to the patriarchal norms, values and practices that privilege men in ways that allow and even encourage them to perpetrate violence against marginalized communities such as women and children, often with impunity. The LGBT rights movement has also brought attention to men’s relationship to homophobia and transphobia. The concept of hegemonic masculinity, as developed by Connell, has emphasized the idea that not all men and not all masculinities are equal — those who espouse attributes of hegemonic masculinity hold power over those who don’t, and reap higher patriarchal dividend. More recently, a number of international conferences have focused on critical studies of contemporary masculinities, and working with men and boys to end gender-based violence.

In this special issue, we want to further investigate the complex relationship between men, masculinities, and violence. According to some recent research studies, adherence to hegemonic gender norms amongst contemporary men from certain contexts and communities is no longer as rigid as it used to be. What is the nature and context of these changes, and what do they mean in the context of violence as a tool of perpetuating patriarchy? What factors and forces resist or promote contemporary men’s and masculine practices of violence? Whilst men’s violence against women has deservedly received significant attention, men’s violence against other men has somewhat escaped scrutiny; how do we understand this through the lens of gender? These are some areas that we seek to explore in this special issue. Other areas that submissions may cover are (this is not an exhaustive list):

- Violence against girls and women and its relationship to men and masculinities
- Bodies, masculinities, and violence
- Working with men and boys to end gender-based violence
- Politics of “men’s rights” groups with regard to violence against women
- Men as victims and survivors of sexual violence
- Men’s gendered violence against other men
- Communal/casteist/xenophobic violence and its relationship to masculinity
- Violence against men with non-hegemonic masculinities and men who are gender transgressive
- Relationship between masculinity, heteronormativity, and homophobic or transphobic violence
- Cisgender men’s violence against transgender men
- Militarized masculinities in the context of war and conflict
- (Pro)feminist men and their work to end men’s gender-based violence
- Men in same-sex relationships who are perpetrators or survivors of domestic violence
- Racialized masculinities and violence against men of color in predominantly white societies

SUBMISSIONS: Original and unpublished papers (5000-8000 words), personal narratives (2000-3000 words), short essays (2000-3000 words), book or film reviews (1000-1500 words), artwork and photo essays are welcome. Please send submissions and enquiries to guest editors Alankaar Sharma and Arpita Das at masculinities@outlook.com

Submission deadline: 10 September 2015

We especially welcome submissions from graduate students (Master’s, PhD).

Graduate Journal of Social Science is an academic, open access, peer reviewed, interdisciplinary, and international journal. For more information and past issues, visit www.gjss.org