men, masculinities and gender politics

Authors

(vi) Violence prevention in Australia in particular

Hopkins, Andrew, and Heather McGregor. (1991). Working for Change: The Movement Against Domestic Violence in Australia. Sydney: Allen & Unwin.

McDonald, John. (2005). Neo-liberalism and the pathologising of public issues: The displacement of feminist service models in domestic violence support services. Australian Social Work, 58(3), September: 275-284.

McKenzie, M. (2007). Backlash and beyond: shifts in community attitudes to domestic violence. DVIRC Quarterly, 1: 16-22.

Morley, Christine, and Selma Macfarlane. (2008). The continued importance of a feminist analysis: making gendered inequalities visible through a critique of Howard Government policy on domestic violence. Just Policy, 47: 31-37.

Morrow, M., Hankivsky, O. and Varcoe, C. (2004). Women and Violence: The Effects of Dismantling the Welfare State. Critical Social Policy, 24(3): 358–84.

Murray, Suellen, and Anastasia Powell. (2009). “What’s the Problem?”: Australian Public Policy Constructions of Domestic and Family Violence. Violence Against Women, 15(5), May: 532-552.DOI: 10.1177/1077801209331408.

National Council to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children. (2009). Time For Action: The National Council’s Plan for Australia to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2009–2021. Canberra: Commonwealth of Australia.

Phillips, Ruth. (2006). Undoing an activist response: feminism and the Australian government’s domestic violence policy. Critical Social Policy, 26(1): 192-219.

Putt, Judy, and Karl Higgins. (1997). Violence Against Women in Australia: Key Research and Data Issues. Canberra: Australian Institute of Criminology (Research and Public Policy Series, No. 6)

Ramsay, J. (2007). Policy activism on a ‘wicked issue’: the building of Australian feminist policy on domestic violence in the 1970s. Australian Feminist Studies, 22(53): 247-264.

Webster, Amy. (2006). Reconceptualising domestic violence: a history of the Howard Government’s approach. DVIRC Quarterly, 3: 14-18.

Webster, Amy. (2007). The Re-conceptualisation of Domestic Violence under the Howard Government Since 1996. Lilith: A Feminist History Journal, Vol. 16: 57-68.

Weeks, Wendy, and Kate Gilmore. (1996). How Violence Against Women Became an Issue on the National Policy Agenda. In Tony Dalton, Mary Draper, Wendy Weeks and John Wiseman (eds.). Making Social Policy in Australia: An Introduction. Sydney: Allen & Unwin (pp. 141–53).