men, masculinities and gender politics

Authors

Race, Ethnicity, Difference

CFP: Constructing Masculinities in Asia

The University of San Francisco Center for Asia Pacific Studies is pleased to announce the call for papers for “Constructing Masculinities in Asia” a conference to be held at the University of San Francisco on Thursday, November 3, 2016 and Friday, November 4, 2016.

Special journal issue on 'Working with Men and Boys' - Now available free

That we need to work with men and boys has become a key mantra of health programmes globally, particularly those concerned with HIV, violence and more recently sexual and reproductive health and rights, and yet there is very little known about how effective these programmes are, nor of the challenges, opportunities and politics of this work. A special issue of Culture, Health and Sexuality draws together a number of globally recognised authors to reflect on the field, as well as provide provocative insights into the politics and processes of working with men and boys.

Challenging Patriarchy: Unsettling Men and Masculinities (IDS Virtual Bulletin)

Challenging Patriarchy presents contributions to the evolution of thinking on men and masculinities in Gender and Development, drawing on three IDS Bulletins published over a period of more than a decade: Men, Masculinities and Development (2000), edited by Andrea Cornwall and Sarah White, Sexuality Matters (2006), edited by Andrea Cornwall and Susie Jolly, and

Engaging Men from Diverse Backgrounds in Preventing Men’s Violence Against Women

In this presentation, I first briefly outline the rationale for involving men in efforts to prevent and reduce men’s violence against women. I offer an intersectional analysis of gender, difference and violence. I first offer an intersectional account of men and masculinities, and I then also offer an intersectional analysis of violence against women. I then spend the remainder of the paper exploring effective ways in which to engage men from diverse backgrounds in violence prevention.

Christianity, Masculinity and Gender Violence in Papua New Guinea

Here's a new report of interest. Richard Eves writes, "... My focus here is on the churches and how some churches are grappling with the problem of violence against women (particularly violence in the domestic or marital sphere). It is important to take into account that violence against women is violence based on gender, because this demands a broader study of all the ways that gender, including masculinity, is constituted..."
See http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/blogs/pacificinstitute/2012/04/03/christia....

Society Must Stop Disrespecting Black Women

I have become increasingly disturbed by an ongoing pattern of wanton, arrogant and in some cases, downright hostile behavior that has been directed toward Black women.  Yes, I am male but I am also a feminist and strongly support the belief that our female sisters deserve as much dignity as we do. Having the XY chromosome does not allow anyone the right to “act the fool” toward or oppress those with a XX chromosome. 

Tiger Woods’ Cablinasian Burden

Over the past several weeks while reading about the more serious news that has impacted our current society, I have also been reminded about the supposedly ongoing “problems” of golfer Tiger Woods.

Challenging the Performance of Masculinity

“Women are dumb,” Bryan* said, “they already have a thousand things going on in their mind about you, so when you ask her out, set a specific date and time; don’t leave it open-ended.” I think I almost choked on my dinner as I heard him advise my friend, Dave.* I did not want to get into an argument since I had not seen Bryan since high school, but his sexist remarks needed to be challenged.

Engaging Men and Boys in Refugee Settings to Address Sexual and Gender Based Violence

Engaging men and boys has emerged as a vital strategy for ending gender based violence, including in refugee and post-conflict settings. While prevention and response activities are essential, the humanitarian community and host country service providers understand that they must move beyond simply addressing each individual case of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and begin to address the societal, cultural, economic, religious and political systems that either perpetuate or allow for violence based on gender to continue.

Racial Mis-Profiling More Commonplace Among Black Men

From boxer Mike Tyson to the late superstar Michael Jackson. From O. J. Simpson to more recently disgraced serial philanderer Tiger Woods, everywhere you look, it seems that some Black man somewhere is under the unrelenting public microscope for some sort of personal transgression. Moreover, these personal missteps seem to be magnified by an ever carnal, voyeuristic media all too eager to propagate long held stereotypes of men of color, in particular, black men as deviant, psychotic menaces to the larger society.