men, masculinities and gender politics

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Violence

Consent: An XY collection

There are great resources for encouraging norms of sexual consent and respect among men, building skills in negotiating consent, and so on. Here, we have collected some useful, accessible pieces, available in PDF below. Further suggestions are most welcome. Further pieces on XY which focus on consent include the following:

Men's violence against women: Some key readings and reports

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What is men's violence against women? What are its causes and consequences? Here are some key readings and reports, on domestic violence, sexual violence, and other forms of violence against women. They include shorter or more accessible pieces and longer discussions and reports.

The pieces are listed below, and the full text attachments are below them.

Graduate Journal of Social Science, Special issue on 'Men, Masculinities, and Violence'

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The Graduate Journal of Social Science has just published a special issue on 'Men, Masculinities, and Violence'. The issue includes academic papers, personal narratives, and photo series by academics and artists from diverse countries and sociopolitical contexts. As the journal is open-access, the entire issue is free for online access and downloading. You can read it here: http://gjss.org/12/03

Please share with others who may be interested.

Factors influencing influences to violence against women (Journal article)

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Attitudes towards men’s violence against women shape both the perpetration of violence against women and responses to this violence by the victim and others around her. For these reasons, attitudes are the target of violence prevention campaigns. In order to improve understanding of the determinants of violence against women and to aid the development of violence prevention efforts, we review the factors which shape attitudes towards violence against women.

An Intersectional Approach to Engaging Men

In violence prevention, we must move beyond simplistic notions of “white men saving brown women from brown men”. Women from CALD and indigenous communities are not necessarily hapless victims, and nor are immigrant and refugee men any more sexist or violent than their English counterparts. In any context – rich or poor, Anglo or otherwise, newly arrived or fifth-generation – work with men must recognise the intersections of race, class, and sexuality which shape men’s lives.